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The Estate Bond

Growing your estate without undue market risk and taxes

Often we see older investors shift gears near retirement and beyond.  Many become risk adverse and move their assets into fixed income type investments.  Unfortunately this often results in the assets being exposed to higher rates of income tax and lower rates of return – never a good combination.

Or maybe the older investor cannot fully enjoy their retirement years for fear of spending their children’s inheritance.

The Estate Bond financial planning strategy presents a solution to both of these problems. Read more

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The Corporate Extraction Strategy

Transferring a Life Insurance Policy to a Corporation

The Corporate Extraction Strategy involves transferring a personally owned life insurance policy to a corporation for its fair market value (FMV).  When handled properly, it will result in withdrawing capital from the corporation tax free!

The preferred candidates for this strategy:

  • Own a life insurance policy that they wish to maintain;
  • Own all the shares in a corporation;
  • Are usually older and/or would be rated or declined for life insurance due to health concerns. Read more
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Estate Planning for Blended Families

 Avoid Disinheriting Your Children

In today’s family it is not unusual for spouses to enter the marriage with children from previous relationships.   Parents work hard at getting these children to functionally blend together to create a happy family environment.  Often overlooked is what happens on the death of one of the parents. In most cases special consideration for estate planning is needed to avoid relationship loss and possibly legal action.

Typically spouses leave everything to each other and when the surviving spouse dies, the remainder is divided amongst the children.  The problem? Even with the best of intentions, there is no guarantee that the surviving spouse will not remarry and inadvertently disinherit the deceased’s children. Read more

Budget-2015

Budget 2015 Highlights

On April 21, 2015, Finance Minister Joe Oliver tabled his first federal budget.  The provisions of the budget will be of particular interest to owners of small and medium sized businesses, seniors and families with children.  As well, those looking to make certain charitable donations will be encouraged by Oliver’s budget.

Below is a brief commentary on each of the key budget proposals.

For Seniors and Savers

Increase in Tax Free Savings Account (TFSA) Limit

  • Effective January 1, 2015 the annual contribution limit has been increased from $5,500 to $10,000;
  • As a consequence, the automatic indexing of the annual contribution limit has been eliminated;
  • On April 24, the CRA announced that even though this provision is not law as yet, they will allow increased deposits to a TFSA effective immediately.

Read more

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Group Insurance – Only Part of the Solution

Ownership of individual life insurance at its lowest level in 30 years

The Life Insurance and Market Research Association (LIMRA) 2013 study shines a light on a developing problem for Canadian households:

  • Individual ownership of Life Insurance was at its lowest level in 30 years;
  • 3 in 10 households did not have individual life insurance at all;

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ARTICLES OF INTEREST

17
Aug
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Start a family conversation about elder care

BY David Wm. Brown and Sarah Brown

Starting a conversation about someone’s age is a sure way to be the least popular person in the room. But while this is a no-go territory for cocktail party chatter, it’s a conversation you need to have with your parents.

Statistics Canada tells us that in 2007, people aged 45 to 64 paid for 75% of elder care. And now, a new generation is realizing that when their parents need long-term care, they’ll be called upon to fund it.

Read more

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20
Jul
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The 4 Cs of Conflict-Free Family Businesses

Focusing on growth is harder when your co-owners are your relatives

by Fred Pidsadny for ProfitGuide.com

Family-run businesses are like elastic bands—they can be stretched only so far, in different directions, before tensions cause them to snap. Those who run family businesses know that stress can often be elevated by forces that don’t exist in non-family firms, from hiring obligations and bloodline silos to next-generation financial demands to under-performing family members. It’s one thing to discipline or even fire a stranger, quite another to turf a brother or daughter. For such businesses, finding a successful balance is an ongoing challenge.

So how can family-owned businesses avoid conflict and focus on growth? For a number of years I’ve been working with a company run by three brothers, each with their own family and their own unique take on strategy and succession planning. They have benefited tremendously by learning and practicing what I call the four Cs of strategy execution for owner-managed businesses:

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